Category Archives: Muslims

How Blessed I’m To Be A Muslim !!

How Blessed I’m To Be A Muslim !!

~ I Say A Simple Salam To Some, I’m Rewarded.

~ I Smile At Someone, I’m Rewarded.

~ I Pray In Masjid With Jamaat, I’m Rewarded 27 Times More Than Those Who Pray Alone.

~ I Begin Anything With Bismillah, That Action Of Mine Is Rewarded.

~ I Think Of Doing a Good Deed, I’m Rewarded.

~ I Control My Temper, I’m Rewarded.

~ I Hold The Glass With Right Hand While Drinking, I’m Rewarded.

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Importance of Youth’s Emaan

Do you think anyone will offer you job after 50 yrs???

 

No !

 

Can you join any Army after 40 yrs??

 

Certainly Not !

 

Why???

Because every employer needs the Talent of YOUTH !!!

 

If a human can expect this much…Why not Allah can expect..

 

And Verily He has the full rights on us as He is our Creator…

 

Allah expects us to be Pious and Righteous at young age…

 

He Loves the Ibadah [Right Deeds] of Youth…

 

and Allah promises 7 types of people who will be under the shade of Harsh [Allah’s Throne] during Qiyamah [End of the Earth]; where there will be no shade from the scorching sun…

Amongst them are the Young people who Do Right Deeds when they are young and energetic..

 

Young people are busy with their work..job…responsibilities..Yet if they take time to remember Allah…Then Allah becomes pleased with them…

 

And if He wills; He will definitely Reward them…For Allah says..He is most Merciful and Most Beneficent..

 

Letz not waste our Youth and energy….

 

Try to utilize it to the best for Allah’s Cause..

 

May Allah bless us all…Ameen 🙂

 

Remem me in ur DUA

 

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Seven Habits of Highly Successful Muslim Youth

Seven Habits of Highly Successful Muslim Youth

1.Be Truthful
The beloved of Allah, Prophet Muhammad (peace and blessings be upon him), said, as narrated by `Abdullah (may Allah be pleased with him),
Truthfulness leads to righteousness, and righteousness leads to Paradise. And a man keeps on telling the truth until he becomes a truthful person. Falsehood leads to al-fujur [wickedness, evil-doing], and al-fujur leads to the (Hell) Fire, and a man may keep on telling lies till he is witten before Allah, a liar.” (Sahih Bukhari, Book #73, Hadith #116)

2.Be Trustworthy
[Let there be no compulsion in religion: Truth stands out clear from error: whoever rejects evil and believes in Allah hath grasped the most trustworthy hand-hold, that never breaks. And Allah Heareth and Knoweth all things.] (Al-Baqarah 2:256)

3.Have Self-Restraint and Be God-Conscious
[And no one will be granted such goodness except those who exercise patience and self-restraint, — none but persons of the greatest good fortune.] (Fussilat 41:5)

4.Be Thorough
“Yahya related to me from Malik that he had heard that the Messenger of Allah, may Allah bless him and grant him peace, said, ‘I was sent to perfect good character’” (Book #47, Hadith #47.1.8).

5.Be Focused
One thousand ideas go through your head the moment you stand up for prayer. Is that you? Really? What do you make of those ideas? Do you process them? What about when you are sitting in class?
[those who humble themselves in their prayers] (Al-Mu’minun 23:2)

6.Be Punctual
`Abdullah (may Allah be pleased with him) asked “which deed is the dearest to Allah?” the Prophet Muhammad (peace and blessings be upon him) replied, “To offer the prayers at their early stated fixed times” (Sahih Bukhari, Book #10, Hadith #505).

7.Be Consistent
Mother of the Believers `A’ishah (may Allah be pleased with her) narrates that “the most beloved action to Allah’s Apostle was that which is done continuously and regularly” (Sahih Bukhari, Book #76, Hadith #469).

Merit of Sharing Food

Merit of Sharing Food

 

ALLAH SWT says:

“And they give food, in spite of their love for it (or for the love of Him), to the poor, the orphan, and the captive.” (76:8)

 

And eat of the things which ALLAH has provided for you, lawful and good, and fear ALLAH in Whom you believe. [Al-Maeda: 88]

 

Ahadith:

1. Abu Hurairah (May ALLAH be pleased with him) reported: Messenger of ALLAH (PBUH) said, “The food of two persons suffices for three persons, and the food of three persons suffices for four persons.” [Al-Bukhari and Muslim].

 

2. Jabir bin `Abdullah (May ALLAH be pleased with him) reported: Messenger of ALLAH (PBUH) said, “The food of one person suffices for two, the food of two persons suffices for four persons, and the food of four persons suffices for eight persons.” [Muslim].

Commentary: This Hadith indicates that if a few persons share the same dinner-table, a small quantity of food will be enough for many persons. Moreover, this increases mutual love and fellow-feeling.

 

3.Abu Hurairah (May ALLAH be pleased with him) reported: A man came to the Prophet (PBUH) and said; “I am hard pressed by hunger.” He (PBUH) sent a word to one of his wives who replied: “By Him Who has sent you with the Truth, I have nothing except water.” Then he sent the same message to another (wife) and received the same reply. He sent this message to all of them (i.e., his wives) and received the same reply. Then he (PBUH) said, “Who will entertain this (man) as guest?” One of the Ansar said: “O Messenger of ALLAH, I will.” So he took him home and said to his wife: “Serve the guest of Messenger of ALLAH (PBUH).”

 

Another narration is: The Ansari asked his wife: “Have you got anything?” She answered: “Nothing, except a little food for the children.” He said: “Keep them busy with something, and when they ask for food put them to sleep. When the guest enters, extinguish the light and give him the impression that we are also eating.” So they sat down and the guest ate and they passed the night hungry. When he came to the Prophet (PBUH) in the morning, he said to him, “ALLAH admired what you did with your guest last night.” [Al-Bukhari and Muslim].

 

Commentary: This Hadith describes a unique example of hospitality and kindness liked by Allah. It imparts to man the sense of self-sacrifice and a feeling of fellowship.

 

Note: Kindly comment on this article and if you find any better Quranic verse and Hadith please post them.

 

[Annonymouse]

 

[ Learn | Implement | Spread ]

 

Seperations – United

And hold fast, all of you together, to the rope of Allah (i.e. this Qur’an), and be not divided among yourselves , and remember Allah’s Favour on you, for you were enemies one to another but He joined your hearts together, so that, by His Grace, you became brethren (in Islamic Faith), and you were on the brink of a pit of Fire, and He saved you from it. Thus Allah makes His Ayat (proofs, evidence, verses, lessons, signs, revelations, etc.,) clear to you, that you may be guided. [Al-Quran, Ala Imran; 3:103]

We have One Lord [Allah]
One Purpose of Creation [To worship Him alone]
One Final way of Life [Islam]
One Final Ideal [Prophet Muhammad PBUH]
One Final Guidance [Al Quran]
One Beginning [Adan(AS) and Hawwa(AS)]
and One Single Destination [Aakhirat]…

Then from where does the differences come from???

A Question not only to Muslims..but to whole Mankind..!

 

o°o AnnoNyiMouse o°o

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Grave Worship Is Prohibited In Islam !

 In the name of Allah, the Most-Merciful, the All-Compassionate

“May the Peace and Blessings of Allah be Upon You”
Praise be to Allaah, we seek His help and His forgiveness. We seek refuge with Allaah from the evil of our own souls and from our bad deeds. Whomsoever Allaah guides will never be led astray, and whomsoever Allaah leaves astray, no one can guide. I bear witness that there is no god but Allaah, and I bear witness that Muhammad is His slave and Messenger.
 

Bismillah Walhamdulillah Was Salaatu Was Salaam ‘ala Rasulillah
As-Salaam Alaikum Wa-Rahmatullahi Wa-Barakatuhu

Grave-worship
One of the forms of shirk which is particularly widespread in Muslim countries is: graveworship, the belief that dead awliyaa’ (“saints”) can fulfil one’s needs or help at times of distress, and calling upon them for aid. Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning):
“And your Lord has decreed that you worship none but Him . . .” [al-Israa 17:23]
Similarly, they call upon dead Prophets, righteous people and others to intercede for them or to rescue them from some calamity, but Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning):
“Is not He (better than your gods) Who responds to the distressed one, when he calls Him, and Who removes the evil, and makes you inheritors of the earth, generations after generations? Is there any ilaah (god) with Allaah? . . .”
[al-Naml 27:62]
Some of them have adopted the habit of mentioning the name of a shaykh or wali (“saint”) when they stand up, or sit down, or stumble, or encounter problems or distress, so they might say “O Muhammad!” or “O Ali!” or “O Husayn!” or “O Badawi!” or “O Jeelaani!” or “O Shaadhili!” or “O Rifaa’i!” – or they may call upon al-Aydaroos or Sayyidah Zaynab or Ibn Alwaan. Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning):
“Verily those whom you call upon besides Allaah are slaves like you . . .” [al-Araf 7:194]
Some of those who worship graves walk around them as if in Tawaaf, and acknowledge their corners, or touch them, kiss them, wipe their faces with their dust, prostrate towards them when they see them, or stand before them in fear and humility, praying for whatever they need of healing from some disease, or for a child, or for help with some difficulty. Sometimes they call upon the occupant of the grave, saying “O my master, I have come to you from far away, so do not let me down.”
But Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning):
“And who is more astray than one who calls (invokes) besides Allaah such as will not answer him till the Day of Resurrection, and who are (even) unaware of their calls (invocations) to them?”
[al-Ahqaaf 46:5]
The Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said:
“Whoever dies calling on someone else as a rival to Allaah, will enter Hell.”
(Reported by al-Bukhaari, al-Fath, 8/176).
 
one of them shave their heads at the graves, and some have books with titles like Manaasik Hajj al-Mashaahid (“The Rituals of Pilgrimage to Shrines”), mashaahid or shrines referring to graves or tombs of awliyaa’. Some of them believe that the awliyaa are running the affairs of the universe and that they have the power to  benefit or harm.
Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning):
“And if Allaah touches you with hurt, there is none who can remove it but He; and if He intends any good for you, there is no one who can repel His Favour . . .”
[Yoonus 10:107]
 
It is also shirk to make a vow to any other than Allaah, as is done by those who vow to bring candles or lights for the occupants of the graves.
 
Allah Azza wa jal has prohibited the Jannah for the Mushrik!
See Quran:5/72

Who are Muslims?

Know Islam And Muslim

 

Who are Muslims?

 

How many Muslims are there in the world?

There are 1.5 billion Muslims worldwide, living in majority populations in 56 countries including Malaysia, Indonesia, Niger, Egypt and Turkey. There are also significant Muslim populations living in India, China and Russia.  In sharp contrast to popular assumption, only 20 percent of the global number of Muslims is of Arab origin. There are an estimated two million living in Britain.

 

 

 

Are all Muslims the same?

Two Muslim pilgrims during HajjThere is an extraordinary diversity of Muslim cultures stretching from North Africa to Southeast Asia and from Europe to Latin America. There are many Muslim interpretations of Islam that has invoked different schools of theology and law, along with a rich tradition of mysticism commonly known as Sufism. While this diversity exists, there is one underlying unity of belief that binds all Muslims together – the belief in the oneness of God and of his final Messenger, Muhammad.

What do Muslims believe?

The basis of the Islamic faith is the belief in One God (Allah, the Creator, Sustainer, Ruler and Judge of the universe), His prophets such as Abraham, Moses and Jesus, concluding with the last Prophet, Muhammad. Muslims believe in angels, in the books of revelation (Torah, Gospel), the Day of Judgement, in God’s Will, and in Heaven and Hell. Together, these beliefs constitute the seven articles of faith.

Muslims regard Christians and Jews as the ‘People of the Book’, believers who received, through prophets, revelation in the form of scriptures or revealed books from God. Islam, commonly perceived as the ‘youngest’ of the monotheistic religions, is from the Muslim point of view, the original as well as the final revelation of God. The Quran says, “He established for you the same religion as that which He established for Noah, that which We have sent to you as an inspiration through Abraham, Moses and Jesus, namely that you should remain steadfast and make no divisions within it.” [Quran, Chapter 42, Verse 13] Muslims believe that the revelation received by Prophet Muhammad through the Angel Gabriel served the purpose of correcting the human error that had become part of the belief systems of Judaism and Christianity.

What is Islam?

  Know Islam And Muslim

  

 

 What is Islam? 

What is Allah?

Allah is the name for God in Arabic. Allah is also known by his attributes, like The Compassionate, the Merciful, the Loving. Although we use the English pronoun ‘He’ to refer to God, in Islam and in the Arabic language, Allah is a neutral term.

How did Islam originate?

In seventh century Arabia, when society was gripped by idolatry, the divide between rich and poor was growing, and the Arab tribal system was thriving, Muhammad received a revelation that would transform society both within the Arabian peninsula and significantly in other parts of the world. Christianity and Judaism also originated in the Middle East, and the Prophet made clear that far from bringing a new message, he was in fact calling people back to the one true God and to the way of life people had left. The revelations he received corrected distortions that had crept into earlier revelation and called all to return to the ‘Straight Path’ of Islam.

What are the five pillars of Islam?

Belief in one God, Prayer, Alms, Fasting, and Pilgrimage. These form the foundation of faith for every Muslim.

  1. The basic declaration of belief, or Shahada is, “There is no God but Allah, and Muhammad is his messenger.” Declaring this is all that is required of a person who wishes to embrace Islam. 
  2. Prayer, or Salah is the performing of the five daily prayers, at dawn, noon, mid-afternoon, sundown, and nightfall.
  3. Alms, or Zakah, is obligatory on every Muslim as a tax to benefit the poor and needy. Every adult Muslim must contribute a 2.5% of his or her wealth (not income) each year. 
  4. Fasting, or Sawm which takes place in the month of Ramadan, involves self discipline and humility through abstention from food, drink and sex from dawn to sunset. It encourages a sense of empathy with those who go hungry around the world and to give charity. It is a time to focus on spiritual nourishment and refinement of character. It ends with the celebration of Eid-ul Fitr.
  5. Pilgrimage, or Hajj, is to be performed once in a Muslim’s lifetime to the first House of God, the Kabah in Mecca, Saudi Arabia. Pilgrims dress simply in white garments to symbolise the equality of humankind. At least two million Muslims go to perform Hajj in the final month of the Islamic calendar each year. The end of Hajj is marked by the second of two major Muslim festivals, Eid-ul Adha.

What is the Quran?

The Quran, Arabic for ‘recitation’ or ‘reading’, is the scripture of Muslims. They believe that the word of God was revealed through the Angel Gabriel over a period of twenty three years to Muhammad, who died illiterate. He neither authored nor edited the Quran, Muslims believe it is the eternal, literal word of God, preserved and collated in a divinely commanded order.
The Quran was written down during the Prophet’s lifetime in the seventh century by twenty nine scribes who would record the revelations on palm rasps and animal skin. Many of the Prophet’s companions would memorise the entire Quran with the Prophet.The 114 chapters of the Quran speak of the majesty of God, His creation of mankind and life, of the Life Hereafter and the stories of Prophets. The Quran calls for social and religious reform, and places great emphasis on social justice – the rights of women, orphans, the equality of humankind, and moral and ethical principles to govern all aspects of life. 

What are Hadith?

Hadiths are a collection of sayings and actions by the Prophet Muhammad, which were well documented verbal reports by his companions. There are thousands of hadiths from which have been derived the Sunnah, or the Prophet’s way of life. They cover all aspects of living: how to be a good neighbour, how to refrain from slander, how to mourn and even how to maintain personal hygiene. Muslims seek to emulate the Prophetic example in their daily lives as much as possible.

What is the Kabah?

The Ka'ba, MeccaThis building is the most sacred space in the Muslim world. It sits in Mecca, Saudi Arabia and is considered the first house built for the worship of the one God. First built by Adam, the first man and prophet, it was destroyed by floods, but later rebuilt by Abraham and his son Ishmael. By the time of the Prophet Muhammad, it has fallen under pagan Arab rule and used as a shrine for their 360 idols. Muhammad restored the Kabah to its original worship of one God.

How is Islam similar to Christianity and Judaism?

Islam, Christianity and Judaism are all monotheistic faiths worshipping one God. All share common beliefs in prophets and divine revelation. All stress moral rights and responsibilities, and accountability on the Day of Judgment leading to reward or punishment in the afterlife. Each faith emphasises its covenant with God, through Moses for Judaism, Jesus for Christianity and Muhammad for Islam. Islam recognises the validity of Judaism and Christianity and expresses respect for the prophets mentioned in their Scriptures as they are also mentioned in the Quran. Muslims believe in Moses, and Jesus, but they do not believe Jesus as the son of God, rather he was a Prophet born in a miracle birth to Mary. The Quran even mentions the Virgin Mary more often than the Bible, demonstrating the high-regard that Judeo-Christian figures have in Islam.Muslims see the message of Islam as superseding all earlier revelations. They believe the Quran is the complete word of God and that Muhammad is the final Messenger and seal of the prophets. While Muslims respect much of the Torah, the Gospel and the Psalms, they believe that they have been changed by man over the centuries. 

What does Islam say about violence?

The value of life is sacred in Islam, to violate it goes categorically against its principles. The Quran states “If anyone murders an (innocent) person, it will be as if he has murdered the whole of humanity. And if anyone saves a person it will be as if he has saved the whole of humanity” [5:32]. It is not permitted for Muslims to kill or oppress another. The Quran says, ‘Help one another in benevolence and piety, and help not one another in sin and transgression’ [5:2] “Allah loves not the aggressors” [2:190].

What is Jihad?

Often mistranslated as ‘holy war’ jihad is an all encompassing terms that literally means ‘to strive, or struggle’. Within Islam, its context is to strive in the path of God as exemplified by the Prophet Muhammad and his companions. Jihad pertains to the difficulty and complexity of leading a good life, struggling against the evil in oneself and to become virtuous and moral, to perform good actions and to contribute to the betterment of society. It is distressing that today a violent minority have abused the word jihad and have thus distorted its true meaning.

What is the meaning of life in Islam?

Life is a sacred trust from God and a human is a trustee who should handle the trust with honesty and skill, and with mindfulness of God. When God gives life He endows the human being with unique qualities and abilities, and charges the human with certain obligations. God means to help humankind fulfil the purpose of life and realise the goal of existence: to seek the pleasure of God in order to have eternal pleasure in the afterlife.

“Live in this world as if you are a traveller or a wayfarer” is a saying of the Prophet Muhammad. Life may be likened to a journey starting from a certain point and ending at a certain destination. It is a transitory stage, an introduction to the eternal life in the Hereafter.

Britain's Oldest MosqueAccording to Islamic teaching, the best use of life is to live it according to the guidance of God and perform good deeds in order to ensure a place in Paradise. As life is a means to an ultimate end, Islam has laid down a comprehensive system of principles and regulations on how to lead it. Muslims believe that we all belong to God and to Him is our final return. Life, therefore, is a complete circle and death is a doorway that leads to the true eternal existence.

What is the status of women in Islam?

The Quran states that men and women were created to be equal parts of a pair [51:49] and that their relationship is one of love and mercy such that they are like garments to one another. The revelation of the Quran elevated the status of women throughout society via numerous means: abolishing the status of women as property, allowing them to retain their maiden name after marriage, furnishing them the right to vote – thirteen centuries before women attained the right to vote in the UK, and the right to inheritance and owning property and businesses. 

In Islam, education, social and political participation is a duty on both women and men. Early Islamic history saw the rise of Muslim women as scholars, politicians, businesswomen, jurists and doctors at a time when Europe still regarded women as a commodity.

Some verses of the Quran have been quoted to suggest gender discrimination, but there is a clear distinction to be drawn between verses that respond to specific social and cultural contexts and those that represent universal principles. A common area of confusion is the stipulation regarding polygamy, which actually restricted the practice rather than encouraging it at a time when Arabs in seventh century society married many women and being monogamous was not the norm, “if you will not be able to deal justly [with them, marry] only one” [4:3]. It may be noted here that today more than 99% of Muslim marriages are monogamous, polygamy being the exception rather than the rule.

What is hijab?

Hijab is another source of interest and has been victim to much criticism and debate. Modesty in Islam is something that is stressed for both sexes, “Tell the believing men to lower their gaze and guard their modesty, and say to the believing women to lower their gaze and guard their modesty” [24:30–31]. Hijab literally means ‘veil’, ‘covering’ or, barrier’, while the Arabic word ‘khimar’ refers to the head scarf, however hijab has come to take on the meaning of a Muslim woman’s head-dress. Hijab symbolises many things: religious devotion, discipline, respect, identity and modesty.  It is viewed by many Muslim women as another part of their ‘ibadah’ or worship of God since worship in Islam can be seen in a holistic sense, for example, giving charity or helping a neighbour is also seen as acts of worship.

What is Shariah?

Shariah covers all laws and governance pertaining to a Muslim’s life. The Arabic word literally refers to a waterway that leads to a main water source. Just as following all laws and principles set out by Islam, Muslims ultimately submit to the will of God, the source of life. Shariah is a framework that governs interactions between the individual and God, and between human beings. Both have public and private dimensions and both give Islam a prominent role on Muslim community life. Shariah is only applied to Muslims and not to people of other faiths and beliefs.

Does Islam promote race equality?

The Islamic civilisation nurtured genuine social equality irrespective of colour or race. During his final sermon, Prophet Muhammad said, All men are from Adam, and Adam is from clay. There is no superiority of an Arab over a non-Arab, nor a white person over a black person except in God-consciousness. These principles were implemented throughout daily life: in the mosques people of all colours and races met to pray shoulder to shoulder, they worked together in government and academia.

Among the closest companions of the Prophet was the former Abyssinian slave, Bilal who became the first man to call people to prayer, the first muezzin. Prophet Muhammad had ordered him to scale the Kabah on the day of the peaceful conquest of Mecca to call people to prayer. That this man could stand with the divine sanctuary under his feet was a declaration that piety transcends all things and it sent a powerful message to all that racism has no place in Islam.

How did Islam contribute to the field of medicine?

Medical science made extraordinary progress during the Islamic civilisation and formed much of the basis of western healthcare today. Muslim experts pioneered in all areas of medicine including surgery, anatomy, ophthalmology, pharmacology, and physiology. The great Translation movement which began in the ninth century initiated under the Caliph Mamun in Baghdad, led to thousands of Greek works by Aristotle, Plato, Hippocrates, Ptolemy and Galen being translated into Arabic, and this knowledge was later transferred to Europe. Medical texts were not only translated, but their concepts and methods were further developed by the Muslims who pioneered in medical progress. Ibn Sina who was born in the tenth century, known as Avicenna in Europe, became renowned for his magnum opus, the cannon of Medicine – an encyclopaedia covering all aspects of medical practice which was used in the universities of Montpellier and Louvain as late as the seventeenth century. The thirteenth century medic Ibn Nafis discovered pulmonary circulation in contradiction to Galen’s view that blood was continually being made and used up, nearly four centuries before William Harvey announced his discovery that blood circulated around the body in 1616.

What is the relationship between science and Islam?

Scientific discovery and learning flourished under Islamic civilisations for centuries. The remarkable leap in science between the eighth and twelfth centuries was known as the Golden Age of Islam. Today many words from the Arabic language enter the sciences, words like alchemy, algebra, algorithm and alkali. Muslims pioneered in fields of astronomy, mathematics, physics. Muslim astronomers established large observatories and produced highly sophisticated and accurate devices such as the astrolabe which was used in navigation through celestial calculation.

Quranic verses allude to scientific phenomena, like the cosmology: “And He it is Who created the night and the day, and the sun and the moon. They float, each in an orbit. ‘(God is) the one who created the night, the day, the sun and the moon. Each one is travelling in an orbit with its own motion” [21: 33], and to embryology: “We created you out of dust, then out of sperm, then out of a leech-like clot, then out of a morsel of flesh, partly formed and partly unformed” [22:5].

Islam is not at odds with science that has been soundly established, and it is clear that the sciences have enjoyed a thriving development under the Islamic ethos enjoining the pursuit of knowledge and learning.

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